Transforming the future: Building healthcare systems for better outcomes
Everyone knows someone living with cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes or a similarly debilitating illness.

Message from our sponsor Philips

Everyone knows someone living with cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes or a similarly debilitating illness. The fact is that ageing populations, longer lifespans and the rise of chronic disease put extreme pressure on healthcare systems, and it is a top priority amongst healthcare communities to search for strategies and solutions to transform the sector.

No doubt that technology and digitalization are creating exciting new opportunities for this transformation, but given the complexity of healthcare, we need to know the state of affairs. That is why we for the third consecutive year are doing the Future Health Index, in order to pinpoint tangible next steps and recommendations towards the path to higher quality and more efficient healthcare. Value-based healthcare is our starting point, and it is all about providing the right care in the right place, at the right time at the right cost.

Transforming the future: Building healthcare systems for better outcomes
Everyone knows someone living with cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes or a similarly debilitating illness. The fact is that ageing populations, longer lifespans and the rise of chronic disease mean that most countries will face an unsustainable rise in the cost of healthcare if it continues to be delivered in the traditional way. Therefore, future systems will have to deliver more for the money spent, and it is a top priority amongst governments as well as national and global healthcare communities to search for strategies and solutions to challenge this status quo.

This is clearly illustrated by the increasing number of healthcare reforms, the investments in new super hospitals, and the omnipresent media attention towards failures and errors in the current modus operandi. The vast societal attention is also again observed at this year’s political festivals: E.g. Folkemødet in Denmark and Almedalsveckan in Sweden, where healthcare was the number 1 and 2 most popular topics respectively*.

Technology is key
At Philips we are working collaboratively with health systems and care takers to break down the boundaries, remove complexity and deliver on a more seamless approach to healthcare when, where, and how people need it the most. And like a great part of the rest of the industry we see technology and digitalization as the key driver in transforming the healthcare system.

Digital innovation, adaptive intelligence and connected care are creating exciting new opportunities for transformation. Each apply data and mobile technologies to forge leaner and more accessible care pathways. That is e.g. a cardiovascular center treating high-risk cases with less invasive, image-guided technologies that can reduce the length of stay and improve patients’ overall quality of life. Or a research hospital on a mission to create an entirely digital database of tissue samples that will allow pathologists to gain greater insight, facilitating individualized care and optimized treatments.

On a personal/individual level monitoring health and analyzing the full breadth of your personal health data has never been easier. With the current apps and devices, you can set health and wellbeing goals, track your progress and personalize wellness routines. This will help people being responsible for their personal health and reduces the pressure on straining healthcare systems and improves the capabilities of populations into old age.

But measurement is where we start
However, while there are several exciting projects and visible pockets of excellence, the urgent need for largescale and accelerated healthcare transformation only increases by the day. Yet, given the highly complex, fragmented and personal nature of healthcare, the risk is real that we spend too much time talking about the need for change, rather than taking action to develop and scale a future-fit approach.

That is why we for the third consecutive year are doing the Future Health Index to address the state of affairs. While recognizing that there is no silver bullet or one-size-fits-all solution, this study assesses and compares the value being delivered by 16 key national health systems. Moreover, by considering how each of these health systems is evolving, the 2018 Future Health Index offers tangible next steps and recommendations towards the path to higher quality and more efficient healthcare.

The Future Health Index assesses three key measures in a health system’s ability to deliver value-based healthcare: access, satisfaction and efficiency. Access looks at how universal and affordable healthcare is, while satisfaction considers the perspective of healthcare professionals and the general population on a system’s performance and trustworthiness. Finally, efficiency evaluates a country’s relative spending on healthcare as a percentage of GDP.

The World Economic Forum is working towards building a framework for value-based healthcare, yet this is still proving difficult to implement at sufficient speed and on a global scale. As part of the movement to make value-based care a reality, WEF has developed four key pillars of a shift towards this more patient-centric approach:

  • data and health informatics
  • benchmarking, research and tools
  • delivery organizations and change management
  • incentives and payments

Value-based healthcare is about providing the right care in the right place, at the right time at the right cost. And the only way to start improving is to know our starting point.

*Statistics Folkemødet and statistics Almedalsveckan.

Come visit us at WHINN at stand no 84 and hear us speak in session 'How can space facilitate optimal performance, accurate diagnostics, high quality treatment as well as the experience of the patient?' in Track 3: 'Sustainable Hospitals - Hospitals of the future: "health factories" or "wellness facilities"?' 

Contact info: Egil V. Nilsen, Egil.nilsen@philips.com

About Royal Philips
Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) is a leading health technology company focused on improving people's health and enabling better outcomes across the health continuum from healthy living and prevention, to diagnosis, treatment and home care. Philips leverages advanced technology and deep clinical and consumer insights to deliver integrated solutions. Headquartered in the Netherlands, the company is a leader in diagnostic imaging, image-guided therapy, patient monitoring and health informatics, as well as in consumer health and home care. Philips generated 2017 sales of EUR 17.8 billion and employs approximately 75,000 employees with sales and services in more than 100 countries. News about Philips can be found at www.philips.com/newscenter.